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Queenie luvs Quetzalcóatl

Reblogged from mgubia Original: サボテン

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gubia:


maureen gubia


hi there
unfortunately, i’m in dire need of money in lieu of an emergency.
i’m opening up portrait commission slots in any of these three media choices:

-watercolor with chalk pastel combined on watercolor paper
-oil on canvas
-digital 300 dpi 1600 x 1800 px

in the digital category i’m also doing speed paintings for only $10 USD each and fully-fledged portraits for $60. for the watercolor portraits (11 x 15 in. 140 lb) = $125 USD, and for the oil portraits (poster size= 18 x 24 in.) $400

please reblog, thanks
mgubia at gmail dot com

gubia:

maureen gubia

hi there
unfortunately, i’m in dire need of money in lieu of an emergency. i’m opening up portrait commission slots in any of these three media choices:

-watercolor with chalk pastel combined on watercolor paper
-oil on canvas
-digital 300 dpi 1600 x 1800 px

in the digital category i’m also doing speed paintings for only $10 USD each and fully-fledged portraits for $60. for the watercolor portraits (11 x 15 in. 140 lb) = $125 USD, and for the oil portraits (poster size= 18 x 24 in.) $400

please reblog, thanks
mgubia at gmail dot com

(Source: cactuslands)

Reblogged from everyone gives up Original: 365 Days of Horror

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365daysofhorror:

A Mexican Bridal Shop Mannequin Looks Just Like A Preserved Human Corpse.
In the middle of Chihuahua, Mexico, there is a bridal shop that is quite famous. However, it’s not famous because of the dresses. It’s the store mannequins that keep them on the map.
That’s because, for the past 75 years, a startlingly lifelike mannequin stood in the window. That Mexican bridal shop mannequin puzzled locals. According to local legends, the mannequin is actually the preserved daughter of the shop’s former owner.
Disturbing, but is it true? No one knows for sure. Take a look at these pictures and decide for yourself. The detail you’ll be able to see on this corpse bride is incredible.
The mannequin is nick named La Pascualita or Little Pascuala. The owner at the time La Pascualita came to the store was Pascuala Esparza, hence the nick name. Not long after her debut, the locals began to suspect that La Pascualita was actually the body of the owner’s daughter. Pascuala’s daughter, whose name has been lost to history, died tragically from a Black Widow spider bite on her wedding day.

Pascuala denied that the mannequin was her daughter. But the rumor had already taken on a life of its own, and no one believed her.

It’s said that at night La Pascualita will sometimes shift positions in the window, and her eyes will follow you around the store. Her dress changes very often, but only the owner and a few close employees are allowed to dress and undress her. Her hands are filled with little lines and fine hairs, just like any human hand would be.

Some locals and brides to be consider La Pascualita a saint. They pray to her or leave gifts for her with the shop workers.


God, this is so good.

365daysofhorror:

A Mexican Bridal Shop Mannequin Looks Just Like A Preserved Human Corpse.

In the middle of Chihuahua, Mexico, there is a bridal shop that is quite famous. However, it’s not famous because of the dresses. It’s the store mannequins that keep them on the map.

That’s because, for the past 75 years, a startlingly lifelike mannequin stood in the window. That Mexican bridal shop mannequin puzzled locals. According to local legends, the mannequin is actually the preserved daughter of the shop’s former owner.

Disturbing, but is it true? No one knows for sure. Take a look at these pictures and decide for yourself. The detail you’ll be able to see on this corpse bride is incredible.

God, this is so good.

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dynamicafrica:

NEW MUSIC: FKA Twigs - Two Weeks.

The ethereal FKA Twigs just dropped this brand new video for her single ‘Two Weeks’, and she’s more captivating than ever. Directed by Nabil, Twigs channels a mixture of classic Cleopatra visuals and the vampire queen Akasha, played by the late Aaliyah, from the film adaptation of Anne Rice’s Queen of the Damned.

We’re not sure if this is a dedication to the late singer, but we can’t help but notice how something in Twigs’ voice and the more streamlined 90s R&B sound of this song recall the Aaliyah that we once knew.

Reblogged from Instagram Blog Original: Instagram Blog

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instagram.com/p/lK4MYuGgVJ/#francomasini instagram.com/p/lKn1UaHsS5/#marinerodepureza instagram.com/p/lKUReWDhUf/#annagraziacalabria instagram.com/p/lKzCOUg7AI/#jefferybr instagram.com/p/lKsuWtSgHo/#onenamora instagram.com/p/lKzB4pk3IX/#nuria6212 instagram.com/p/lKtCWygMb-/#mikemagliano

instagram:

Ash Wednesday

To view more photos and videos from Ash Wednesday, browse the #ashwednesday and #miércolesdeceniza hashtags.

Ash Wednesday marks the end of most Carnival celebrations around the world. On Ash Wednesday, or the first day of Lent, Anglican, Catholic and Lutheran Christians place ashes on their foreheads as a reminder of human mortality. In many countries, such as Mexico, Chile, the Philippines, Italy and the United States, millions of observers flock to local churches to receive ashes from their priests. Despite its huge Catholic population, the vast majority of Brazilians do not formally observe Ash Wednesday, as many Carnival celebrations continue through Ash Wednesday and only cease at the end of the week.

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fuckyeahapihistory:

In California, a small “Mexican-Hindu” community rose up in the early 20th century, as male immigrants from Punjab – mostly Sikh – married Hispanic women and started uniquely bicultural families. U.S. immigration laws restricted South Asian women from immigrating to America, while miscegenation laws forbid South Asian men from marrying white women. Marriages between South Asian men and Hispanic women – classified by law within the same racial category – resulted in bicultural children with names like “Maria Singh” and “Jose Rai.”

fuckyeahapihistory:

In California, a small “Mexican-Hindu” community rose up in the early 20th century, as male immigrants from Punjab – mostly Sikh – married Hispanic women and started uniquely bicultural families. U.S. immigration laws restricted South Asian women from immigrating to America, while miscegenation laws forbid South Asian men from marrying white women. Marriages between South Asian men and Hispanic women – classified by law within the same racial category – resulted in bicultural children with names like “Maria Singh” and “Jose Rai.”

Reblogged from idiosyncratic Original: Women of Color, in Solidarity

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